The first days in Hiroshima!

Phew!

Welcome everybody! After an action packed week in Tokyo with my fellow student Sofia Wachtmeister, we took the Shinkansen (the fastest train in the world!) to Saijo, Hiroshima. And there is certainly no rest for the wicked!

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So far the Master’s Summer School on Global Citizenship and Peace has introduced us to a wonderful group of people, all of different national origin and with different stories of life. Except for us Swedes, the other students are from Indonesia, South Korea, Italy, Spain, USA, Vietnam, Denmark, Australia and China.

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We have engaged in interesting discussions on global citizenship, tried the local cuisine (Okonomiyaki, delicious!) and started to conspire against each other for the UN role-play on Saturday.

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We have all prepared a paper for this week, covering one of four themes on global citizenship and peace. These are to be presented and critiqued by other members of the group. As one of the first discussant and presenter, I found that it was an enlightening experience to have such a mixed group with different background to give me feedback. At this course, we have come in contact with differing teaching styles and study techniques – due to the different backgrounds of both teachers and participants – but what we’ve realized is that despite cultural and academic differences, many of us a working towards the same goal: bettering our understanding of the world and our role in it.

At the welcoming party that was held this night, we also got a chance to mingle with participants of other groups. As these couple of days have passed, we are starting to realize that the coming week will be as intense as it will be fun!

Stay tuned for Sofia’s account of crazy Tokyo and the upcoming activities of Hiroshima!

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En Route

4/8, 13:30 PM

I am so glad that I have discovered the chilled waiting cubicles available on most train platforms (they are obvious once you are aware of them, but poor signage lead to most tourists suffering outside). Being cool increases the convenience of waiting for trains by a mile. Kyoto, which I have just left for Hiroshima and the INU Student Seminar commencing today, is notably hotter than Tokyo. Another way of avoiding the heat is to spend time in shops equipped with air-conditioner, something I have dedicated most of my time to do whilst in Kyoto. Despite spending countless of hours exploring almost every traditional Kyoto craft shop I must admit being a tad disappointed by the offering. If its truly traditional it’s ridiculously expensive, otherwise it’s mostly cheap kitsch. Before finding this out I bought a load of bubble wrap in the Japanese equivalent of a £1 shop (JPY 100 shop), believing I was going to wrap tons of Japanese ceramics. So potteryless I am now dragging around two huge rolls of bubble wrap. Luckily they are super light and they serve a good excuse for purchasing and wrapping loads of Japanese beer and Hiroshima made sake to bring back to the UK. With neither a decent Yukata in sight, despite looking around in second hand shops, not a classic Kyoto knife (the only REAL old knife producer, unlike many other, was closed) I have left Kyoto with barely more than a few pairs of silk socks and a mini Totoro figure (an essential buy if you love the film).

Since the temple shut their door at 9 PM, in order for the guests to wake up refreshed at 5 AM and participate in the morning ceremony, there have been no social activities late at night during my stay. Instead I have enjoyed watching the monks going about their business in the temple village and the older, more religious, demographic of Japan, who prays outside the temples in the morning. This demographic is also extremely well mannered and gives everyone they meet, without exception, a good morning greeting followed by a short bow. Therefor peaceful morning walks in the temple village was pretty intensive since you have to stop every 5 seconds in order to greet. At 7 AM a vegetarian breakfast was served in the dining hall, in accordance with Buddhist teaching of not killing any living creatures. Scattered outside the temple area is many vegetarian (and a vegan Michelin starred restaurant!) to my delight. On the note of vegetarian food, the pillow I slept on during my stay in the temple was filled with rice and must have been the most uncomfortable piece of bedding ever made. I rather sleep on my bare arms than on a bag of rice, which felt like a lump of concrete after a while.

Whilst in Kyoto I had many new culinary experiences. The vendors at the Nishiki food market happily gives away their samples and after passing through what felt like hundreds of stalls I was completely stuffed. As a green tea lover I am thrilled by all green tea filled stuff and the only food item I dislike so far is the Daifuku, filled with Azuki bean paste. I suppose you get used to them as treats if you grow up eating them, but I cannot understand the Japanese joy over Azuki bean paste. However, I have enjoyed plenty of raw egg in Kyoto. Raw egg and noodles, raw egg for breakfast and raw egg, which to be fair you later cooked yourself on a mini gas stove at your table, with rice. Will do further research if this is a typical Kyoto thing.
A final note, I really appreciate the Japanese traditional Ofuro baths I have been fortunate of having every single night before going to bed. The picture below is from my Tokyo bath but I have enjoyed a similar styled one in Kyoto as well.

Sayonara!

/ Hedvig

1.Platform cubicle, 2. Temple stay, 3. Raw egg, 4. More raw egg, 5. Bath

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Raw Egg

Another Raw Egg

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Impressions so far.

I (Nadja) just arrived at Green Hotel Morris in Higashi, Hiroshima. It has been a long flight for me and Lea, which is also attending this years student seminar in Hiroshima as a participant from Malmö University. Since we mostly have been stuck inside airplanes and airports before arriving at our hotel, our impressions of Japan are limited. However, the things we have noticed is that both Tokyo and Hiroshima are super clean – there is nothing left behind anywhere which even applies to the public bathrooms.

Speaking (or writing…) of japanese bathrooms, they are quite different from the swedish ones. Several colored buttons near the toilet indicate different activities such as getting sprayed with water. I have heard that some toilets also have a button for singing, which I look forward to hear, try and see!
Besides being a clean country we have only so far had great interactions with people. Even if our knowledge of the japanese language is extremly limited we have managed to buy bus and train tickets and order really good food. For a vegetarian as myself it might be a bit tricky to find the “right” food even if we have noticed that restaurants almost always have pictures of the food on the menu. Sometimes it can be hard to actually tell if a dish is vegetarian or not, but at Hiroshima airport we managed to order a completely vegetarian (at least I think it was) noodle soup. Our chopsticks skills were not satisfying since the cook gave us forks after a while. However, we will not give up our attempts to eat food in Japan the japanese way!
Now it is time for some sleep before having a japanese breakfast in the morning and exploring Hiroshima!

Konichiwa

11:33 AM

Greetings from Japan,

After 3 days in Tokyo I am now on the Shinkansen train towards Kyoto and I am utterly impressed with the Japanese transportation system. The trains are remarkably clean and nearly always on time (if not, you will receive the information, including an explanation behind the delay, on the live feed available on all public transport vessels), but the best must be the music played when arriving at certain stations. The tune varies depending on the stop but its generally an upbeat bitpop jingle, which always makes me smile. The purpose of these tunes is to ensure that daydreaming travellers, or sleeping commuters, wake up and don’t miss their stop.

Despite knowing about the Japanese appreciation for neat and tidiness prior to my trip, I am thoroughly amazed by the overall cleanliness. The safety of Japan stretch from the overall low crime rate to the extreme safety measures taken when public works are carried out. They usually employ a person, whom’s sole purpose is to guard the publics’ safety. The other day I was walking across the wonderful park located to my place of stay and despite walking several meters away from the park workers, who was trimming the lawn, surrounded by warning signage and blocked off by cones, I was asked by a uniformed man to kindly walk even further away from the works, in case I was going to be hit by grass. Every roadwork usually have such a guard, who simply watches the whole in case someone would remove the blockade and step into the whole. Health and safety measures to the top!

During my stay in Tokyo I have been fortunate to know people who live here, whom have guided me around town and provided answers to all my silly questions, like why people are wearing face masks (which is not, despite what one might think, to protect themselves from polluted air or bacterias, but to protect others from the bacterias oneself carries). My friends work colleague was wearing one the other day, due to a light cold, and he explained that it would be awfully embarrassing if he was to cough in the office. Good manner is also to clean your hands everywhere you go. Disinfection agent, or sanitary towels, is provided at mosts counters, such as at the post office, shop and restaurants. One does not generally eat or drink in public, again in order to show consideration for others, whom might not want to watch you eat. I made the faux pas by eating my Onigiri in public, when I should have gone to a hidden spot or a park. This could be one of the reason behind the absence of public litter. Another reason is the general prohibition to smoke outside, which the odd naughty smoker ignores. This results in no butts on the ground! Same goes for take away cups. Despite serval Starbucks I have yet not seen a single person drinking coffee from a take away cup. This also stems from the tradition of setting time aside for food and drink, it is not meant to be consumed in a rush.

However, the absence of smokers outside does not stop them from smoking inside, in connection with a meal. Whilst dining in the Ebisu area I found most people, and kitchen staff, smoking. It appears that behind the cleanness frenzy facade lies little filthy secrets. Japan is not particularly Eco friendly with little green energy and recycling.

Another backside is of the great organisational machinery, that represents the Japanese society to well. According to some non-Japanese friends it can be very frustrating for foreigners to work in Japanese companies at time. When suggesting new ideas, they are consider to have an attitude problem according to their superior managers, since it is not their place to voice opinions. As a ordinary worker, in contrast with managers higher up in the hierarchy, one is to follow all rules to precision at all times, regardless of whether the rules are efficient or not (many are not since great value is placed on the tradition of how things is to be done, which can be most ineffective at times) and without questioning. This of course results in some very good things as well, like the impeccable service one receives, or the genuine quality of production and food. To carry out ones work with the highest precision and accuracy appears to be equally important at all levels of employment. Nothing is done on a whim.

The consideration taken of others benefits me as a visitor greatly. Everyone is astoundingly polite and possess great manners. In the company of Japanese I feel terribly clumsy and rude. I have yet to learn the difference between the numerous levels of politeness when greeting, depending on to whom you speak to. The only skill I master is Japanese table manners. Despite the difficulty eating a whole fish with chop sticks I managed to wipe all the meat of the bones, for which I received paise from a Japanese friend.

If ever visiting Tokyo, make sure you stay or visit it’s old town, Yanaka, which survived both the great fire of Tokyo in the 30s and the WWII. The neighbourhood is very quaint, with a strong community feel. Before I left my traditional Ryokan, I signed the owners petition for preserving an old local tree, currently in threat of being torn down. The locals also worry a great deal about the widespread housing development in Tokyo, where the tall buildings leaves the elderly stranded on the top floors, unable to go out and about.

In a few short hours I shall join the monks and experience some zen through the daily meditation practises. At the temple I shall abide strict rules for sleeping hours, eating habits and silence. Per request my friend telephoned and organised my stay, and since there is no English spoken or website providing any information, I am somewhat nervous about not following the procedures correctly and offending the monks by doing something wrong (like sticking your chopsticks in the rice bowl is only done at funerals). However, regardless if I do or don’t they probably won’t tell me off since it would be impolite to do so. Despite Tokyo being surprisingly still, at least in comparison to hectic London where people elbow their way forward on the tube and police sirens constantly roaring, I long for the calm of the Myoshinji temple village of Kyoto.

/ Hedvig

1. Tatami, 2. Tsukiji, 3. Yanaka Cemetary, 4. Okonomiyaki

Tatami

Scallops

Yanaka

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Breakfast at Tiffany’s…

…sadly not, though my company (Linnea) was much more good-looking than Audrey Hepburn. The food was interesting, a mix of the western styled breakfast; white bread, white buns accompanied with some strawberry jam, and the Japanese mash of ingredients colors textures and flavours.

Today we are heading out for Hiroshima; it’s time for some sightseeing,

Sayonara!

Kevin & Linnea from the INU Summer School in Japan

Hiroshima-City-Map(Map of Hiroshima City)