February 10. Maria Bendix Wittchen: Different role, different ethics? Journalists’ role performance and their views on ethical challenges and dilemmas while covering a murder trial.

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Maria Bendix Wittchen, visiting PhD candidate in Media and Communication Studies, K3.

The title of the seminar is Different role, different ethics? Journalists’ role performance and their views on ethical challenges and dilemmas while covering a murder trial.

This will be an online seminar, carried out through Zoom, and it will take place on Wednesday, February 10 at 10.15-12.00. Please join here: https://mau-se.zoom.us/j/63396017631?pwd=VzZGa2xPM001aXAwNHJRamkwcm9iQT09.

Here is an abstract for the seminar:

The trial against amateur submarine builder Peter Madsen for the murder of the Swedish journalist Kim Wall was one of the most publicized trials in recent Danish history. This article presents the result of a study examining journalists’ press ethical views and attitudes when covering the high-profile murder trial. Drawing on qualitative interviews with 10 of the most prominent reporters covering the trial, I examine the various ethical dilemmas the journalists face on the court beat during this intense period in 2018. Though the Submarine Trial may be considered an extreme case, today’s trial journalists work in a media industry characterized by increasingly online reporting and live coverage of unfolding events. This includes covering the police’s ongoing crime investigations (Wittchen 2019) and live trial reporting from the courtroom (Knight 2017). At the same time we see a ‘featurization’ of hard news (Steensen 2011) which increasingly involves crime news (Lehrmann 2011, 2016b). All these changes bring a focus on new ethical challenges facing reporters covering live crime trials (Deuze and Yeshua 2001; Friend and Singer 2007). Previous research on press ethics in relation to crime and trial reporting have focused on the press council verdicts (Brurås 2009), court reporters understanding of codes of ethics (Ezhar et al. 2012), race and bias in television magazine trial coverage (Grabe 2000) and the elements of entertainment in court reporting (Chibnall 1981; Vinson and Ertter 2002; Whannel 2010).

This paper has a qualitative and empirical focus and I draw on the theoretical framework of role performance (Mellado 2015). Through role performance the study shows how the journalists can be divided into two main roles, the storyteller and the reporter. To some extent their role performance is different as well as their perception of the ethical dilemmas they are facing. The reporters are focusing on facts, objectivity, relevance and avoiding biased reporting. The storytellers are more concerned about telling the real story and paying regards to the readers (in relation to publishing too many details). By using a qualitative approach, the study shows that within the same beat – covering the same trial – journalists to some extent have a common understanding of the ethical pitfalls in the coverage but at the same time perceive the ethical dilemmas quite differently which relates to their role, media type and demand of content. The analysis also shows how one journalist can switch role and ethical perspective depending on the time of the trial (before or after the verdict).

February 3. Annika Olsson: Representation. Voices. Democracy.

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Annika Olsson, Head of K3 and Docent (Associate Professor) in Comparative Literature.

The title of the seminar is Representation. Voices. Democracy.

This will be an online seminar, carried out through Zoom, and it will take place on Wednesday, February 3 at 10.15-12.00. Please join here: https://mau-se.zoom.us/j/65367307806?pwd=TzNxVlVBdWpkb3V3L3h2RTIzVzFQdz09.

Here is an abstract for the seminar:

Almost on the day (Jan 26th) 100 years after the decision in the Swedish Parliament that women should have the right to vote in Sweden, I will talk about the research that I have done and the research I am doing and how it is connected to representation, voices and democracy. I will reflect upon the multiple functions of representation (symbolic, political, artistic) and how representation in different ways is related to democracy, voices and bodies as well as to everyday practices in arenas central to our contemporary democracies, not least the public sphere and Academia. I will return to the key question in my PhD-thesis (Att ge den andra sidan röst) – the huge difference between giving a voice and being a voice in the public sphere – and I will use examples from on-going research (article on the Swedish tidskrift Puss and a book on Public Intellectuals in Sweden) to say something about 1) representations that are viewed as problems in democracies and 2) representation as a challenge in and to democracies.

Fredrik Strömberg: Comics and the Middle East – Cultural appropriations and visual exchanges

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Fredrik Strömberg, PhD candidate in Media and Communication Studies, K3

The title of the seminar is Comics and the Middle East – Cultural appropriations and visual exchanges.

This will be Fredrik’s 90 percent PhD seminar. Margareta Wallin Wictorin, Docent (Associate Professor) in Art History and Visual Studies, Karlstad University, will function as discussant.

This will be an online seminar, carried out through Zoom, and it will take place on Wednesday, January 27 at 10.15-12.00. Please join here: https://mau-se.zoom.us/j/62927830949?pwd=ODl6YlNuV3Y3T1E1OVFVNUllbC9kZz09

If you would like to get a copy of the draft of the cover article (“kappa”) for the forthcoming thesis, please mail Fredrik at sekventiellt@me.com.

David Cuartielles: Maker culture in Spain fighting covid-19 from home – How the commodification of the experience could save the day

Welcome to this term’s first K3 seminar. It will be held by David Cuartielles, Lecturer in Interaction Design.

The title of the seminar is Maker culture in Spain fighting covid-19 from home – How the commodification of the experience could save the day

This will be an online seminar, carried out through Zoom, and it will take place on Wednesday, January 20 at 10.15-12.00. Please join here:

https://mau-se.zoom.us/j/66899052794?pwd=NmdjR1JDSXhxQkJ3b1M4U3pDUTQ5UT09

Below you will find an abstract.uct Design, K3

Abstract for the seminar with David Cuartielles:

For the Spanish DIY communities year 2020 was the one when their actions gained international recognition. Ten of thousands of DIY aficionados without a defined political or institutional affiliation found ways to collaborate in fighting against the Covid-19 pandemic using their 3D printers and other open source tools. Thanks to the immediacy of existing instant messaging platforms, so-called makers of all ages opened hundreds of discussion channels where to share designs, and join forces in the manufacturing and distribution of over a million face shields. This group became the Coronavirus Makers movement and expanded to other countries to exchange creations and expertise.

But why did such a movement emerge in Spain and nowhere else? Spain has a strong DIY tradition that can be studied by following different types of DIY spaces: hacklabs, hackerspaces, makerspaces, fab labs, and after school academies (sorted in chronological order). The Spanish technosocial fabric grew during a period of almost 30 years. As time went by one could witness a certain commodification of the experience of the original DIY cultures – the hacker culture. Commodificaiton should be understood as the commercialisation of the experience of being part of something, a DIY culture in this case. We observed how the more commodified a culture became, the more spaces emerged dedicated to that specific DIY subgroup.

In parallel, we observed a process that we have defined as commoditisation. It consists in the progessive elimination of the essential values of a movement reducing the friction of joining it. For example, hacklabs have a very strong leftist component that hackerspaces – arriving later in time – removed from their foundational charters.

It is this parallel process of commodification and commoditisation what seems to have helped the DIY culture expand in Spain and move from the shared spaces to the homes of the makers. Having thousands of 3D printers and personal electronic laboratories available at people’s homes allowed for the distributed response of the Coronavirus Maker movement to the pandemic. The question remains on whether this movement will survive or will simply vanish after some time.

This seminar will open with a presentation of two different papers co-authored by David Cuartielles with Cesar Garcia to later introduce the challenges faced by the Coronavirus Makers movement. It will hopefully serve as an opening to discuss the construction of civic ad-hoc responses to crisis situations, the importance of existing platforms and tools, the [non] governance of emergent systems, and the role that design researchers can take in fully immersive fieldwork.

Please note that the previously announced seminar with Hugo Boothby has been moved to March 12

Erin Cory and Hugo Boothby: Picturing home. Sharing memories and building solidarities in Malmö

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Erin Cory, Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication Studies and Hugo Boothby, PhD candidate in Media and Communication Studies.

The title of the seminar is Picturing home: Sharing memories and building solidarities in Malmö

This will be an online seminar, carried out through Zoom, and it will take place on Wednesday, November 25 at 10.15-12.00. Please join here:

https://mau-se.zoom.us/j/61846446118?pwd=SDJqZnhJNFdPN3k4dWZRQUt5TGwzUT09

Abstract for the seminar:

This seminar presents a current overview of a three-year research project called ‘Performing Integration: Participatory Art and New Publics in Malmö.’ Funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, the project set out to observe and theorise the role of community arts spaces in developing solidarities between new arrivals and autochthonous Swedes, and in challenging current discourses about what ‘integration’ means.

In this seminar, we present both the story of this ongoing project, as well as a publication under review. In collaboration with local organisation Konstkupan (Art Hive), Erin developed a series of arts workshops designed around ethnomimetic methods (O’Neill 2010), which were all set to go early in 2020, when the pandemic hit. To adapt to this new state of things, she took the workshops online. The transmedia storytelling (Jenkins 2007) that grew across multiple platforms illustrates both the unexpected convergences and persistent fault-lines of belonging in a ‘postmigration’ (Petersen & Schramm 2017) context.

As part of this pivot to the digital, Hugo came onboard as an expert in radio broadcasting and, in this instance, podcasting. In the final part of the seminar, Hugo and Erin will present a co-authored piece that came out of the spring’s workshops. In this article, currently under review, we work at the intersection of migration studies and radio studies to examine podcasting’s potential as a practice-based research method. We do this primarily by theorising podcasts as ‘boundary objects’ (Star and Griesemer 1989, Star 2010), which do not demand consensus on the meanings they produce, and so afford space for both synchrony and dissonance in participants’ recorded narratives.

Saskia Gullstrand: Cinematic storytelling in comics

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Saskia Gullstrand, Lecturer in Comics, K3.

The title of the seminar is Cinematic storytelling in comics

This will be an online seminar, carried out through Zoom, and it will take place on Wednesday, November 18 at 10.15-12.00. Please join here:

https://mau-se.zoom.us/j/65766558955?pwd=RUNrUGtBNnZWcGtUZUFONGZQM21UUT09

Abstract for the seminar:

Film and comics share one very fundamental storytelling technique – the image montage, which offers the possibility to show the story to the reader through a sequence of images. Through artistic research, I’m investigating what montage strategies artists can use to create a cinematic flow in comics, and the effects it can have on the emotional involvement of the reader of narrative comics.

In this seminar, I’ll discuss what cinematic flow within comics narration can look like, with a focus on grid structure in page layout, the relationship between images and text and the use of dynamic “camera” perspectives and field sizes in the images. By combining my viewpoint as a comics creator and storyteller with academic comics theory, I want to conduct artistic research in comics that exists in dialogue with other forms of comics research, but also serve artists and their practices as storytellers.

This is work in progress. From the seminar, I’d like constructive critique on how to move forward, but also exchange ideas on how to create a dialogue on methods of artistic research between academia and comics artists, as well as an exchange of knowledge and perspectives on comics as an art form.