Solveig Daugaard: Media ecologies of literature in a digital age. Affective interfaces and alternative infrastructures

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Solveig Daugaard, Visiting Comparative Literature Researcher at K3. The title of her talk is:

Media ecologies of literature in a digital age: affective interfaces and alternative infrastructures

The talk will take place on Wednesday, March 20, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk:

At the K3 Seminar, I will present my current postdoctoral research project (titled: Media ecologies of literature in a digital age: affective interfaces and alternative infrastructures) and give a little background upon my previous research on the aesthetic reception of American avant-garde writer and feminist and queer icon Gertrude Stein where I have developed the methodological framework of media ecologies, interfaces and infrastructures that I intend to develop further in the new project.

In a Scandinavian context, my project explores the changed conditions of print literature in an age of digital media. With new materials and media platforms the production, distribution and reception of literary works and the author’s persona as an assemblage of different material elements have challenged the printed page as the primary interface for readers’ engagement with literature. The project approaches this in two different ways: First, it examines examples of innovative writing (Hagen, Börjel, Farrokzad, Aburas) that all criticize this interface, and challenge its illusory naturalization as a direct product of an embodied, empirical author. Second, it analyzes the emergence of new collaborative writing and publishing communities (OEI, Laboratory of Aesthetics and Ecology, Antipyrine) that break the dominance of this authorial interface by establishing independent infrastructures for literature less dependent upon the idea of literature as an autonomous, individually authored art form and attempt to integrate writing and publishing with other social, political/activist or scholarly practices. The project departs from the substantial divide between textual scholarship and the highly affective responses to and political uses of literature that have engaged many writers and readers in recent years. It sets out to update the definitions and terminology of literary scholarship to understand the changed interfaces and infrastructures of literature as consequences of a digital media environment to make literary scholarship better equipped to understand and analyze the affective impact and the socio-political potential of literature in today’s Scandinavian societies.

In my presentation for the seminar I will focus on the first part of the project, concerned with the persona as affective interface, and establish this phenomenon from Gertrude Stein to contemporary Danish authors Lone Aburas and Christina Hagen, and discuss possible connections to ideas of affective infrastructuring.

Li Jönsson: Socioecological Design / experimentations

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Li Jönsson, Associate Senior Lecturer in Design, K3. The title of her talk is:

Socioecological Design/experimentations

The talk will take place on Wednesday, March 6, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk:

In this seminar I will dwell on my past and hint towards design research futures as a way to frame and present myself as a rather new team member at K3.

However, to talk about both past and futures requires that I situate myself right now. Hence, this talk will be focused on my main interest and concern, on the ongoing exploration of what a non-anthropocentric framework in design might be, as well as do. This is consistent with the discussions of a wider turn to experimentation and invention in recent nature–society debate – the view that experimentation is necessary to engender new forms of knowing and dwelling in and with human and nonhuman others. Challenging nature-culture dualism as designers enables, or asks us, to practice how to become posthuman-designers. But, how do we go about doing this – what forms of experimentation might we need to create mutually beneficial relationships and more ecological entanglements between and among this sprawling multiverse?

To question not just arrangements between humans, but to open up to an entirely different universe – or multiverse – of actors I have for a while used the figuration of the ‘event’ as a design exploration. This has allowed me to argue for how human and non-humans ‘equally’ come together in a process and allow for things to become different. One of the important arguments here, is that in constructing new types of collective life (and by that, sustainability) and in conceiving new technologies, we must avoid constantly disentangling humans and nonhumans. I will exemplify how I have in my previous design experiments been dealing with these kinds of issues. However, in continuation of previous work, I would like to discuss some ‘ghosts’ in my research. These ghosts have haunted me for a while, and takes the shape of core feminist arguments around corporeality, materiality, embodiment, affectivity and experientiality, and how we might attended to such sensibilities in humble ways as designers.

Temi Odumosu: The Crying Baby. On Colonial Archives, Digitisation, and Ethics of Care in the Cultural Commons

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Temi Odumosu, Senior Lecturer in Cultural Studies, K3. The title of her talk is:

The crying baby: On colonial archives, digitisation, and ethics of care in the cultural commons

The talk will take place on Wednesday, February 27, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk:

This seminar sketches key concerns I am engaged with in a new speculative paper I am writing for Current Anthropology on representational ethics and care. In essence I am concerned about attending to the dead in the digital commons. I argue that as museums, archives and other cultural heritage institutions make their colonial collections digitally available online – providing direct public access to troubling and contested materials – unresolved representational issues are magnified and new dangers emerge. If digitised artefacts represent a form of remembrance, ensuring that artefacts are not forgotten in storage (a solution to decay), then what shifts in institutional practices could take place, if we asked questions such as:

  • What does it mean for an archive or collection to provide open digital access to materials representing violated subjects who did not necessarily consent to being documented?
  • To what extent are institutions taking seriously non-European perspectives on looking at, or engaging with, ancestor remains?
  • How can we better understand the effects of unmediated, screen-based engagement with the material outcomes of biased and racist value systems?
  • And, how can we extend concepts of caretaking and custodianship beyond the institutionally directed ethical guidelines, currently provided by professional advocacy institutions?

Exploring what an ethics of care and/or custodianship might look like when engaging with such questions, this seminar seeks to provoke critical dialogue about the delicacies of caretaking colonial histories both on and offline – histories rife with carelessness. At the same time, I explore reparatory artistic engagements with such digitised images, and further describe how metadata might be rethought as a cataloguing space with the potential to alter the imbalances of historical power.

Tobias Olsson: Warm experts for elderly users. Who are they and what do they do?

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Tobias Olsson, Vice Dean and Professor of Media and Communication Studies at the Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University . The title of the talk is:

Warm experts for elderly users: Who are they and what do they do?

It will take place on Wednesday, February 13, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk.

Abstract:

This paper examines “warm experts”—that is, nonprofessional persons who help inexperienced users come to terms with digital devices—and their significance for the use of digital media in everyday life by elderly Swedes. We analyze data from a national survey (N = 1264) and from qualitative, semistructured interviews with 18 elderly Swedes (aged 65+). Our data reveal that the warm expert usually is a closely related person, often a child or grandchild, who is strongly involved in nearly every stage of technology domestication, from appropriation (i.e., identifying the need, buying the item, and installing and adjusting it) to incorporation (i.e., choosing and downloading suitable apps, teaching how to use them, and solving technical problems). Although the clear majority of elderly Swedes have been online for more than a decade, the need for continuous assistance from warm experts seems to persist also among experienced users.

Alicia Smedberg: Modalities of Agency within Infrastructuring Processes

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Alicia Smedberg, PhD student in Interaction design. The title of the talk is:

Modalities of Agency within Infrastructuring Processes

It will take place on Wednesday, February 6, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara, and it will be Alicia’s 30 percent PhD seminar. Pelle Ehn, professor emeritus in Interaction design, will function as discussant.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk. If you would like to read Alicia’s text before the seminar, please mail her: alicia.smedberg@mau.se.

Abstract:

This Ph.D. centers around the issue of agency within Participatory Design (PD). While  the issue of agency bares relevance almost anywhere we look – and is inseparable from questions of power and governance; structure and solidarity; and from acting (regardless of how and why we act) – it holds particular bearing to the democratic principles of PD.

Over the past 18 months I have been conducting an inquiry into the particular issues that arise within infrastructuring processes spanning across the public and civic sectors. Through an on-going presence in two long-term projects (Amiralstaden and The Do-Think-Tank), and two fixed-term projects (Livskonceptet, and a case study around wind turbines and landownership in Orkney) I have sought to identify traits of agency. Questions of how and when to act, and of equal importance, when not to act, require strategies that cannot be contained by a universal rule but must be the result of a repertoire of sensitive approaches towards the practitioner’s situation. Within the 30% seminar, as well as within this Ph.D. as a whole, I seek to exemplify, with the support of anecdotes from the case studies, three modalities of agency: illumination, sensitization, and emancipation. While I have taken to the habit of speaking about these three modalities as a journey or a trajectory (to highlight the constant movement they encompass), it is important to note that neither agency nor emancipation is a fixed state that can be reached.

The seminar will provide a summary of the 30% text: In its initial half it attempts to map out the very bedrock of the project: its disciplinary position; its ontology, epistemology and methodology; its methods. In doing so I hope to afford the reader an insight into the how and why I have partaken in my case studies. The case studies will then be elaborated on briefly, followed by a discussion and reflection on future directions.

Åsa Harvard Maare: Collaborative problem-solving through embodied interaction

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Åsa Harvard Maare, Senior Lecturer in Visual Communication at K3. The title of the talk is:

Collaborative problem-solving through embodied interaction

It will take place on Wednesday, January 30, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk.

In most scientific studies on collaborative problem-solving, it is framed as an outcome of – mainly – verbal interaction between problem-solvers. Collaborative problem-solving is achieved through negotiation, discussion, comparison. In this paper I want to approach collaborative problem-solving as a mainly embodied activity, regulated by gaze, body position, gesture, imitation etc.

The “problem” to solve is a geometrical problem expressed in visual form. Problem-solvers are 9-year old children working in pairs in the classroom during a mathematics lesson.

The method is interaction analysis. A video camera in the ceiling plus two handheld cameras document how problem-solvers take turns, observe other pairs, talk and interact, and to what extent these activities help them solve the problem.

What I will present during the seminar is the raw material (in spoken/discussed format) of a paper intended for the International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, and I look forward to all criticisms and constructive proposals that the participants may come up with.

Keywords: observational learning, motivation, learning design, ethnomethodology, interaction analysis

 

Elisabet Apelmo: Non-disabled bodies, gazes and emotions. A visual study in ableism in the crossroad of artistic and feminist sociological research

Welcome to this term’s first K3 seminar. It will be held by Elisabet Apelmo, visual artist and sociologist at the Department of Social Work, Malmö University. The title of the talk is:

Non-disabled bodies, gazes and emotions. A visual study in ableism in the crossroad of artistic and feminist sociological research.

It will take place on Wednesday, January 23 at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk.

The project draws from Apelmo’s double competence as both visual artist and sociologist. The purpose is to explore cultural representations of able-bodied people’s gazes and emotions in the meeting with the physically disabled body. The intersection between gender (that is, different forms of masculinities and femininities), class and dis/ability (that is, both bodies that are considered to have ‘normal’ physical ability and the ones that are regarded as deviant) will be analysed. The project is situated within critical disability studies and draws from theories about body, gazes and emotions. Three analytical methods will be used: (1) visual analysis, (2) associative writing and a research diary and (3) the making of public works of art and texts. The aims of the project are, firstly, to create an understanding of different practices of looking and thus contribute to a challenge of the cultural forces of ableism. Secondly, to explore how feminist sociology and visual arts may inform and develop each other.

Program for spring series 2019 complete

The program for the spring series 2019 is now complete. You can find it on the page “Seminar series spring 2019” as well as below:

Wednesday, January 23 at 10.15-12.00

Elisabet Apelmo, visual artist and Senior Lecturer, Department of Social Work, Malmö University

Non-disabled bodies, stares and emotions. A visual study in ableism

Wednesday, January 30 at 10.15-12.00

Åsa Harvard Maare, Senior Lecturer in Visual Communication, K3

Designing for collaborative problem-solving

Wednesday, February 6 at 10.15-12.00

Alicia Smedberg, PhD student in Interaction Design, K3

Modalities of agency within infrastructuring processes (30 percent PhD seminar)

Wednesday, February 13 at 10.15-12.00

Tobias Olsson, Vice Dean and Professor of Media and Communication Studies, Faculty of Education and Society, Malmö University

Warm experts for elderly users: Who are they and what do they do?

Wednesday, February 27 at 10.15-12.00

Temi Odumosu, Senior Lecturer in Cultural Studies, K3

The crying baby: On colonial archives, digitisation, and ethics of care in the cultural commons

Wednesday, March 6 at 10.15-12.00

Li Jönsson, Associate Senior Lecturer in Design, K3

Caring for ghosts, decay and magic in posthuman design

Wednesday, March 20 at 10.15-12.00

Solveig Daugaard, Comparative Literature researcher, K3, spring 2019

Media ecologies of literature in a digital age: affective interfaces and alternative infrastructures

Wednesday, March 27 at 10.15-12.00

Susan Kozel, Professor of New Media, K3

“Affective choreographies” or a Somatic materialism of mobile media

Wednesday, April 3 at 10.15-12.00

Charlotte Sörensen, Lecturer in Product Design

A framework for teaching reflective practices in design education

Wednesday, April 10 at 10.15-12.00

Dario Salvo, Associate Senior Lecturer in Design, K3

Technologies for the good: Mobile health and IoT for the environment

Wednesday, April 17 at 10.15-12.00

Jakob Svensson, Professor of Media and Communication Studies, K3

Behind the algorithm

Wednesday, April 24 at 10.15-12.00

Maliheh Ghajargar, Associate Senior Lecturer in Design, K3

A journey from (Industrial) design to (Interaction) design… and vice versa

Wednesday, May 15 at 10.15-12.00

Jens Pedersen, Senior Lecturer in Interaction Design, K3

Cultivating desire and absence in design ethnography

Wednesday, May 22 at 10.15-12.00

Johan Farkas, PhD student in Media and Communication Studies, K3

Disguised propaganda in the digital era: Race and racism in weaponised media (30 percent PhD seminar)

Wednesday, May 29 at 10.15-12.00

Maja Fagerberg Ranten. Interaction Designer and PhD student in Computer Science, Roskilde University

Designing artistic interactive systems from a phenomenological perspective – Designing for the body with the body