Åsa Harvard Maare and Charlotte Asbjørn Sörensen: Experiential, embodied and practice-oriented learning. Perspectives on teaching and learning at K3

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Åsa Harvard Maare, Senior Lecturer in Visual Communication, K3 and Charlotte Asbjørn Sörensen, Lecturer in Product Design, K3.

The title of their talk is:

Experiential, embodied and practice-oriented learning: perspectives on teaching and learning at K3.

The talk will take place on Wednesday, May 22, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk:

We will approach the pedagogy of K3 from our different pedagogical perspectives, with the aim to visualize the pedagogical landscapes at K3 and establish a joint language. Central concepts are practice-based research, experiential learning, peer learning, production-oriented learning, skilled learners, embodiment and collaboration.

Åsa Harvard Maare: Conceptualizing students’ contributions to the learning process (20 min presentation)

Charlotte Asbjørn Sörensen: Applying theoretical perspectives in a design process: pedagogical challenges (20 min presentation)

All: Discussion. How can we facilitate exchange between programs, teachers and students at K3? Are there research opportunities that could strengthen and develop the multi-faceted pedagogies used at K3?

Jens Pedersen: Cultivating desire and absence in design ethnography

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Jens Pedersen, Senior Lecturer in Interaction Design at K3. The title of his talk is:

Cultivating desire and absence in design ethnography

The talk will take place on Wednesday, May 15, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk:

In this talk I’ll argue that researching desire is the key to make ethnographic fieldwork work and be productive for designers. Ethnography has long been a stable of design research, but there is lack of clarity about how an ethnography should be crafted to be ‘generative’ for design as it were. Typically, the role of ethnography is framed as one of ‘informing’ design, but it is typically unclear how a deeper understanding of the present can be productive in imagining the future. Drawing on experiences from working with ethnography in design practice (and the supervision of many student projects) I argue that traditional ethnographic approaches borrowed from anthropology and sociology are problematic in design because they tend to be ‘presentist’. For a design ethnography to not just inform, but also inspire it needs to focus not just on what ‘is presently there’, but also on what ‘is manifestly not there’, what is absent.

This may sound — maybe — unnecessarily theoretical, but in the talk I give concrete examples of how a text focusing on present absences (desires) compared to just presence performs differently vis-à-vis the designer — how the former inspire ideas where the later does not.   

Because of a certain disappointment with ethnography in design we have seen various arguments for moving beyond ethnography towards more interventionist approaches that dismisses the value of understanding the present to design the future. The problem with these approaches, however, is that they also frame ethnography in presentist terms and therefore tend to overlook the potential of ethnography. The talk, then, is an attempt to both reconceptualise and rehabilitate ethnography in design by cultivating an appreciation of desire and absence in design ethnography.

Maliheh Ghajargar: A journey from (Industrial) design to (Interaction) design… and vice versa

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Maliheh Ghajargar, Associate Senior Lecturer in Interaction Technologies at K3. The title of her talk is:

A journey from (Industrial) design to (Interaction) design… and vice versa

The talk will take place on Wednesday, April 24, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk:

During my first K3 seminar I would like to mainly introduce my previous works, present a synthesis and then introduce a preliminary research idea that I am currently developing! So, my seminar will have three main parts: The first part will be an introduction about my previous design and research projects as a design researcher and design practitioner, with a particular focus on my PhD dissertation project entitled: Designing Tools for Reflection: a Concept-driven Approach”.

The second part will be about a design approach and probably also a design methodology, that I think it has been developing during and after my PhD dissertation and it is still in progress! That approach is inspired by research through design and concept-driven approaches (e.g. Stolterman, E. & Wiberg, M., 2010). It favours a cross-disciplinaryinclusive and critical approach in design (Ghajargar, M., & Bardzell, J., 2019) and it has four main phases from informing by theories to constructing theories.

And the last part of my seminar will be focused on my research project idea, that I am currently developing. The topic is around aesthetics and forms of interaction with everyday use objects that make us think and reflect on actions, by using IoT technologies — e.g. in the areas of education, energy consumption or health. From a design perspective, I would use aesthetics as an approach that does not only value the arts and the beauty of everyday life, but also as an integral and essential part of the usefulness of interactive artefacts. I will inform my work by available literatures across different disciplines on form giving practices, aesthetics of interaction, and design for reflection, so hopefully, to be able to (re-)open up to some areas to (re-)explore.

Hence, as the title of my presentation suggests, I wish to make sense of my journey from being an industrial designer to an interaction design researcher, by constructively building upon the resources and values that these different areas of design, share.

Jakob Svensson: Behind the News-Ranking Algorithm. Actors, conflicts and logics when implementing algorithmic automation

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Jakob Svensson, professor of Media and Communication Studies at K3. The title of his talk is:

Behind the News-Ranking Algorithm. Actors, conflicts and logics when implementing algorithmic automation

The talk will take place on Wednesday, April 17, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk:

This study revolves around on the process of introducing and implementing an algorithm to rank and mix news on the front-page of a leading Scandinavian daily. The focus of this article is what happens to an institution with its’ taken-for-granted norms, rules and imagination, when introduced to algorithmic automation. This is studied through a qualitative methodology mainly consisting of interviews. The aim is to contribute with a sociological approach to researching algorithms with a focus on the actors, conflicts and logics involved behind algorithms. Actors involved can be grouped into traditional news actors (journalists and editors), and tech actors -(programmers, UX designers, data analysts, tech and web developers). The media group, to which the daily adhered, was an actor with its demand for profit, including the advertising and the subscription departments, as well as the newspaper brand and the algorithm itself. The study discerns three different logics, sometimes competing and sometimes intersecting: a market logic with its value of profit, a higher purpose logic of news journalism with its values of democracy, and finally a logic of personalization with its popularity principle and imagination of giving users what they want through an unbiased algorithm. The article concludes that while journalism is not completely taken over by programmers and algorithms, it is apparent that tech actors, with their values of user experience, rules of data-driven development and logic of personalization, are becoming a force to be reckoned with.

Dario Salvo: Hacking for good. Mobile health, assistive technologies and the environment

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Dario Salvo, Associate Senior Lecturer in Interaction Technologies at K3. The title of his talk is:

Hacking for good. Mobile health, assistive technologies and the environment

The talk will take place on Wednesday, April 10, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find a short abstract for the talk:

I will use the opportunity of this talk to introduce myself, my past research and my interests. I will try to draw a line to connect the rather diversified projects I have been involved in. I have had the luck to apply technology to relevant areas like health, environment and assisting those with special needs. Regardless of the seriousness of some of these topics, I have always tried to keep a playful, Do-It-Yourself approach when learning and using technology. Join this talk to listen to my experience and to discuss ideas for future research collaborations

Solveig Daugaard: Media ecologies of literature in a digital age. Affective interfaces and alternative infrastructures

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Solveig Daugaard, Visiting Comparative Literature Researcher at K3. The title of her talk is:

Media ecologies of literature in a digital age: affective interfaces and alternative infrastructures

The talk will take place on Wednesday, March 20, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk:

At the K3 Seminar, I will present my current postdoctoral research project (titled: Media ecologies of literature in a digital age: affective interfaces and alternative infrastructures) and give a little background upon my previous research on the aesthetic reception of American avant-garde writer and feminist and queer icon Gertrude Stein where I have developed the methodological framework of media ecologies, interfaces and infrastructures that I intend to develop further in the new project.

In a Scandinavian context, my project explores the changed conditions of print literature in an age of digital media. With new materials and media platforms the production, distribution and reception of literary works and the author’s persona as an assemblage of different material elements have challenged the printed page as the primary interface for readers’ engagement with literature. The project approaches this in two different ways: First, it examines examples of innovative writing (Hagen, Börjel, Farrokzad, Aburas) that all criticize this interface, and challenge its illusory naturalization as a direct product of an embodied, empirical author. Second, it analyzes the emergence of new collaborative writing and publishing communities (OEI, Laboratory of Aesthetics and Ecology, Antipyrine) that break the dominance of this authorial interface by establishing independent infrastructures for literature less dependent upon the idea of literature as an autonomous, individually authored art form and attempt to integrate writing and publishing with other social, political/activist or scholarly practices. The project departs from the substantial divide between textual scholarship and the highly affective responses to and political uses of literature that have engaged many writers and readers in recent years. It sets out to update the definitions and terminology of literary scholarship to understand the changed interfaces and infrastructures of literature as consequences of a digital media environment to make literary scholarship better equipped to understand and analyze the affective impact and the socio-political potential of literature in today’s Scandinavian societies.

In my presentation for the seminar I will focus on the first part of the project, concerned with the persona as affective interface, and establish this phenomenon from Gertrude Stein to contemporary Danish authors Lone Aburas and Christina Hagen, and discuss possible connections to ideas of affective infrastructuring.

Li Jönsson: Socioecological Design / experimentations

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Li Jönsson, Associate Senior Lecturer in Design, K3. The title of her talk is:

Socioecological Design/experimentations

The talk will take place on Wednesday, March 6, at 10.15-12.00 in The K3 Open Studio, NIC 0541, Niagara.

Below you will find an abstract for the talk:

In this seminar I will dwell on my past and hint towards design research futures as a way to frame and present myself as a rather new team member at K3.

However, to talk about both past and futures requires that I situate myself right now. Hence, this talk will be focused on my main interest and concern, on the ongoing exploration of what a non-anthropocentric framework in design might be, as well as do. This is consistent with the discussions of a wider turn to experimentation and invention in recent nature–society debate – the view that experimentation is necessary to engender new forms of knowing and dwelling in and with human and nonhuman others. Challenging nature-culture dualism as designers enables, or asks us, to practice how to become posthuman-designers. But, how do we go about doing this – what forms of experimentation might we need to create mutually beneficial relationships and more ecological entanglements between and among this sprawling multiverse?

To question not just arrangements between humans, but to open up to an entirely different universe – or multiverse – of actors I have for a while used the figuration of the ‘event’ as a design exploration. This has allowed me to argue for how human and non-humans ‘equally’ come together in a process and allow for things to become different. One of the important arguments here, is that in constructing new types of collective life (and by that, sustainability) and in conceiving new technologies, we must avoid constantly disentangling humans and nonhumans. I will exemplify how I have in my previous design experiments been dealing with these kinds of issues. However, in continuation of previous work, I would like to discuss some ‘ghosts’ in my research. These ghosts have haunted me for a while, and takes the shape of core feminist arguments around corporeality, materiality, embodiment, affectivity and experientiality, and how we might attended to such sensibilities in humble ways as designers.