Pille Pruulmann Vengerfeldt: Visitors, users and audiences – modes of engagement for diverse audiences in museum communication?

Welcome to a seminar with Pille Pruulmann Vengerfeldt, Professor of Media and Communication Studies K3. The title of the seminar is:

Visitors, users and audiences – modes of engagement for diverse audiences in museum communication?

It will be held at Wednesday, December 13 at 10.15-12.00 in room NIC 0541 (K3 Open Studio), Niagara.

Here is an abstract for the talk:

In this seminar, I would like to discuss the potential of descriptive and prescriptive analytical frameworks to evaluate museum communication. Museums are targeted by a number of large societal changes like digitalization of cultural heritage, attention economy where museums are increasingly expected to “earn their keep”, but also challenges on truthfulness, authority and democratization of knowledge. Different researchers have approached museum participation (Simon, 2010) or museum engagement (Lotina, 2016) from a diversity of angles, some from more normative perspectives than others. At the same time, museums are grappling with these challenges the best they can, often with little or no analytical support. Visitor studies paradigm takes a very instrumental and functionalist approach to learning, resembling more media effects studies paradigm that is often criticized by more contextual and critical media studies. I am hoping to discuss with interested colleagues a research proposal idea that would help to develop in practice an analytical framework of museum people which would use the advances of media and audience studies and contextualise those for museums, but also add to specific knowledge in museum studies area. The framework could be used to understand what museums offer for diverse audiences and how can different modes of engagement be meaningfully used to facilitate museums to diverse audiences.

 

 

Ronald Stade: The Irony of Sectarianism in Lebanon

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Ronald Stade, professor of Peace and Conflict Studies/Anthropology, on Wednesday, November 29 at 10.15-12.00.The title of the talk is:

The Irony of Sectarianism in Lebanon

The talk will be held in room NIC 0541 (K3 Open Studio) in Niagara,

Here is an abstract for the talk:

The constitution of Lebanon recognizes eighteen confessional sects. Political conflicts and offices, patron-client networks, settlement patterns, marriages and other civil law matters, etc., largely follow sectarian dividing lines. This type of sectarianism creates an identitarian map that is absolute in that it is disjunct (no identity can belong to two sects), categorical (one either belongs to a sect or one does not) and exhaustive (no individual goes un-belonged). Periodically, the borders on Lebanon’s sectarian map turned bloody as identities were weaponized. Even so, both in times of war and in times of peace political and social alliances have been created across sectarian borders. In the absence of a functioning welfare state and public spirit, private and political alliances serve to mobilize resources and alleviate risks. At closer inspection, the absolute map of Lebanese sectarianism turns out to be more pragmatic than often assumed. This raises the question of confessional and political commitment: How committed are the people of Lebanon to their respective sect? After an overview of Lebanon’s sectarianism, the issue of commitment, and more specifically of sectarian commitment, will be discussed against the background of Søren Kierkegaard’s denunciation of irony as a lack of commitment. At stake is the relationship between sectarian commitment, private self- interest and irony as a public virtue.

 

Sara Bjärstorp and Petra Ragnerstam: Fortune and Felicity: Literature and Embodiment in Participatory Culture

Welome to a K3 seminar with Sara Bjärstorp and Petra Ragnerstam, Senior Lecturers in English Studies at K3. The title of the talk is:

Fortune and Felicity: Literature and Embodiment in Participatory Culture

The talk will be held on Wednesday, November 15 at 10.15-12.00 in room NIC 0541 (K3 Open Studio, Niagara).

Here is an abstract for the talk:

What happens when the world of Jane Austen is materialized in live action role playing? In this seminar we present recent field work on a major avant-garde live action role playing game (larp) where Jane Austen’s novels were adapted into a collaborative storytelling event. During five days, over one hundred participants constructed a collective story by embodying characters from Jane Austen’s world. In comparison to other adaptations, fidelity to the original is not the focus, but rather the participants’ immersion in the story and the storyworld. We will focus on how gender and sexuality was constructed in the game which is interesting since gender is a major issue in the novels, the numerous other adaptations of Jane Austen’s novels and in the construction of the Regency period. It was also a major issue in the creation of Fortune and Felicity and a major experience that the participants had of the larp. How was gender produced in the larp and what means did the participants have to produce gender and sexuality in specific ways? Was subversion possible, and if so, how? 

Charlotte Asbjørn Sörensen: Moral and Temporal Aspects of the New Material Taxonomy

Welcome to a K3 seminar with Charlotte Asbjørn Sörensen, Lecturer in Product Design at K3. The title of the talk is:

Moral and Temporal Aspects of the New Material Taxonomy

It will be held on Wednesday, November 8, at 10.15-12.00 in the K3 Open Studio (NIC 0541, Niagara).

Here is an abstract for the talk:

We all surrounded by materials in our everyday life. Most of the time we take them for granted without contemplating on what role they play. I choose to see materials are active agents in a complex interplay between form, function and the experience of an object. Today we grow materials, we engineer smart materials and designers create their own materials in MDD-processes. How does that effect our approach to materials as designers, consumers and as teachers/researchers at K3? How do we introduce materials and materiality to our students at K3? Does interaction design look at smart materials as technical The fast consumption of materials in relation to limited resources have challenged the temporal side of materials. Can we create sustainable materials that allow fast consumption? What moral aspects do we encounter in such a design process?

 

Ewan Fernie: Shakespeare and Freedom

Welcome to a seminar with Ewan Fernie, Chair of Shakespeare Studies, University of Birmingham. The title of the seminar is:

Shakespeare and Freedom

It will be held on Wednesday, November 1, at 13.00-15.00. Please note that it will be held at Intiman, Malmö Stadsteater, Östra Rönneholmsvägen 20.

Abstract for the seminar:

“So why does Shakespeare matter? I want to suggest, in this article, that he matters because he can teach us to be free, by which I mean that he can inspire us to live fuller, more expressive lives, both as individuals and as a society. Shakespeare can do this because his characters give us vital, unforgettable examples of that freedom. Whether we meet them on the page or on the stage, on celluloid or on YouTube – and whether we encounter them in the original English or in translation – Hamlet and Juliet, Macbeth and Cleopatra, Falstaff and Rosalind, as well as countless other of Shakespeare’s memorable creations demonstrate a freedom to be themselves that can help us to change our own lives for the better.”

“Some of the most canny and charismatic freedom fighters in our history have also recognised and made their own, more political use of Shakespearean freedom”.

Ewa Berg, Kajsa Lindskog, Helena Malm, Margareta Melin, Gunnel Pettersson, and Bjørn Wangen: Risking Quality Assessments. An Analysis of Assessment Criteria for Arts-Based Assignments

Welcome to a seminar on assessing arts-based examinations. It will be held by a group of researchers from two teaching environments at Malmö University: The School of Arts and Communication (K3), and Culture, Language and Media (KSM) at the Faculty of Education and Society. The teachers holding the seminar are Ewa Berg, Kajsa Lindskog, Helena Malm, Margareta Melin, Gunnel Pettersson, and Bjørn Wangen. Dennis Augustsson and Håkan Magnusson have also participated in the project but will not be present at the presentation. The title of the seminar is:

Risking Quality Assessments. An Analysis of Assessment Criteria for Arts-Based Assignments

It will be held on Wednesday, October 25, at 10.15-12.00 in room NIC 0541 (K3 Open Studio in Niagara).

Below you can find an abstract for the talk;

Conceptions of the aesthetic are multifaceted, associated with taste and the sensual, and elusive beyond words. The aesthetic is often seen as the absolute opposite of scientific facts. And yet, it has found its way into academic institutions, other than art-schools and conservatoires. In tertiary education everything is assessed and assessments are constructed along alignments. In this context, also arts-based courses and modules, which use aesthetics and arts-practices as learning modes, need to align course outcomes with syllabus with assessment criteria. And formulating assessment criteria of arts-based examinations could be difficult. It is in this context this paper is written, based on a two-year research project with the aim of analysing and problematizing arts-based assessment criteria. In this paper we want to present and discuss the main results of the project.

The project Arts-based Assessments, involves eight senior/lecturers from two departments in two faculties (K3 and KSM: Culture, Language and Media). We have all have worked together to analyse assessment criteria (both from home-departments at Malmö University and from Swedish Academies of Art and Crafts) used in courses based on arts-based examinations, and with aesthetics as underlying criteria. Particularly useful have been the cross-analysis, i.e. KSM-staff has analysed K3-courses and vice-versa. This way we have brought into light what is so natural to us in our every-day work.

Theoretically, Taguchi’s (2013) concepts pedagogic documentation and active agents, Biggs’ (2007) notion of knowledge creation through art, and Selander and Kress’ (2010) concept didactic design have been used to frame our discussion.

The empirical part of the paper starts off with the main result of our analysis. We give three examples where we found concepts and/or practices that reveal particular stories of knowledge. The first of these is that of risk-taking, which we discuss both in the sense of assessing how students take risks as a measure of quality in arts-based projects, but also how we as lectures take risks in assessment processes. The example we give is a module at the end of the art-teacher course, where the assignment (an arts-based project) is assessed through criteria students construct themselves.

The second story involves the risk-taking (or lack thereof) of assessing aesthetic qualities. In non-art schools, but where arts and design are taught, there are discussions going on of whether to assess aesthetic qualities or not. This is clearly reflected in our research material. Examples from a Media Studies course is given, where arts-based learning-activites and assessments are used in a traditionally “theoretical” module.

The third example is also touching on risk-taking, as it entails experimenting and playing as way of knowledge making. With examples from a Stage Design course we discuss the im/possibilities of assessing knowledge creation through art, and how pre-school pedagogy can be useful in arts-based university assignments.

The paper concludes with a discussion of the possibilities of assessing aesthetic qualities. We argue that it is indeed not only possible, but also desirable. It is evident that multi-modal/arts-based forms of learning-activities enable multi-faceted knowledge-making beyond the traditional reading-and-writing. But choosing this involves risk-taking for both staff and students. All assessment criteria are however subject to interpretation and it is better to put words on paper than to hide evaluative notions in-between the lines in a pretence objectivity. This suggests the need for transparency in the assessment process, e.g. through peer-reviewing techniques and through letting students construct criteria together with the lecturer. There are words for the elusive, and it is better to put words on paper than to hide evaluative notions in-between the lines in a pretence objectivity.

Magnus Persson och Petra Ragnerstam: Om metodologiska utmaningar inom humaniora

Welcome to a seminar with Magnus Persson, Professor of Comparative Literature, Faculty of Education and Society, and Petra Ragnerstam, Senior Lecturer in English Studies, K3. It will be held at Thursday, October 12, at 15.15-17.00 in Room NIC 0541 (K3 Open Studio) in Niagara. The seminar is organized as a collaboration between K3 and the Post-Graduate Study Program in Swedish and Didactics (SMDI) at the Faculty of Education and Society. The title of the seminar is:

Om metodologiska utmaningar inom humaniora. The seminar will be held in Swedish.

Here follows an introduction to the seminar:

Planen för seminariet är att läsa tre texter ur boken Humanister i Fält, och diskutera problem, utmaningar och fördelar med dessa metodologiska angreppssätt. Deltagare kan naturligtvis även läsa fler texter ur boken. Tanken är också att vi utgår från, och därmed också presenterar, vår egen forskning och diskuterar de metodologiska problem och utmaningar vi stöter på där.

Texter att ha läst ur Humanister i Fält:

Förord (sid 7-9)

Christian Lenemark: Att studera litterära värdeförhandlingar – en litteraturetnografisk ansats (sid 11-22)

Lisbeth Larsson Att promenera Virginia Woolfs författarskap (sid 39-47)

Boken finns att läsa online: http://libris.kb.se/bib/19790554

Peter Parker and Staffan Schmidt: Enabling Urban Commons

Welcome to a seminar with Peter Parker, Senior Lecturer in Urban Studies and Staffan Schmidt, Senior Lecturer in Design in Theory and Practice, both at Malmö University. The title of their seminar is:

Enabling Urban Commons

It will take place on Wednesday, October 4, at 10.15-12.00 in room NIC 0541 (K3 Open Studio) in Niagara.

Below you can find an abstract for their talk:

An increasing interest in commons has generated a rich literature related to co- and participatory design (PD). Besides providing examples, cases and methods, this literature often displays interpretations that are recognisably engaged and political in which commons have acquired an additional symbolic value. In some cases this symbolic value propels more ambitious narratives in which other, post-industrial/post-collapse futures or utopian societal forms are prototyped or infrastructured. Although this literature highlights an important connection between collaborative design and collaborative governance, we hold that the conception of commons underpinning some of these efforts is not fully relevant in contemporary urban contexts. In the following article we describe the practical and normative issues raised by transferring the concept of commons to a contemporary urban setting. We critique aspects of how the concept has been invoked in Co-Design and PD but also seek to demonstrate how it may be applied constructively, paying due attention to both network and subtractive effects of shared resources and acknowledging interrelations with the public sector.

Presentation of new PhD students in Interaction Design, and in Media and Communication Studies

Welcome to a K3 seminar with K3s four new PhD students in Interaction Design and in Media and Communication Studies:

Marika Hedemyr, PhD student in Interaction Design

Therese Hellberg, PhD student in Media and Communication Studies

Alicia Smedberg, PhD student in Interaction Design

Veera Virmasalo, PhD student in Media and Communication Studies

At the seminar, they will talk about their experiences before coming to K3, and they will talk about their PhD plans.

The seminar will take on Wednesday, September 20 at 10.15-12.00 in room NIC 0826, Niagara.