New publications by Erasmus Mundus PhD Candidates

 Agil Valiyev (Odlar Yurdu University, Baku) and Elnur Aliyev (Tbilisi State University), both Erasmus Mundus PhD candidates at the Section for Caucasus Studies in Malmö, have recently published conference papers.  Congratulations!

Elnur  Aliyev (left) published a conference paper on the North Caucasian Dagestan language Budukh: “Genetic Map of the Budukh Nation”, in the section “Regional Cultures and its Researchers” at the VI International Scientific Conference, January 25-26, Prague, pp. 38-47.

The title of Agil Valiyev‘s (right) publication is “The understanding of cultural diplomacy, its history and Azerbaijan model” at the same conference but in the section “Informatization and Features of the Development of Dialogue between Cultures”, pp. 58-66.

 

New publication: Endangered Languages of the Caucasus and Beyond

Recently published: Endangered Languages of the Caucasus and Beyond, edited by Ramazan Korkmaz and Gürkan Doğan. Brill Publishing , 2016.

The volume is based on the 2014 International CUA Conference on Endangered Languages, organized by the Caucasus University Association (CUA) at Ardahan University, Turkrey. Prof. Karina Vamling, Malmö University, contributes with an article on Megrelian.
Read more about the publication:
http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/…/9789004328693;jse…

New publication on mega events

IMG_0861Professors Bo Petersson and Karina Vamling (Malmö University) are the authors of the chapter “Vanished in the Haze: White Elephants, Environmental Degradation and Circassian Marginalization in Post-Olympics Sochi” that recently appeared in a topical volume on mega-events in the series Mega Event Planning.

As the text on the cover states: “The edited volume explains why sport mega events can be discusssed from the viewpoint of politics and power, and what this discussion can add to the existing scholarship on political regimes, international norms, national identities, and cultural narratives.”IMG_0860

Editors of the book Megaevents in Post-Soviet Eurasia. Shifting Borderlines of Inclusion and Exclusion (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016) are Andrey Makarychev (Tartu University, Estonia) and Alexandra Yatsyk (Kazan University, Russia). More info about the book.

Manana Kobaidze translates Georgian poetry into Swedish

IMG_2058

Work of the young Georgian poet Lia Liqokeli is now available in Swedish thanks sto the translators Manana Kock Kobaidze (photo) and Kristian Carlsson. The book Så skrattade jättens fru (How the Giant’s wife laughed) was published at the end of 2015 by Smockadoll Publishing House.

The book is presented and reviewed in the Swedish journal Tidningen Kulturenhttp://tidningenkulturen.se/index.php/litteratur-topp/litteraturkritik/20813-litteratur-lia-liqokeli-sa-skrattade-jattens-fru

Georgia Today writes about the Georgian-Swedish cultural event: Modern Georgian Writer Admired by Swedish Critics http://georgiatoday.ge/news/2683/Modern-Georgian-Writer-Admired-by-Swedish-Critics

 

 

Special issue of “Sport in Society” on developments in Sochi and Russia after 2014

spinsoc (1)The journal Sport in Society. Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics has recently published the special issue When the party is over: developments in Sochi and Russia after the Olympics 2014, edited by Bo Petersson (Malmö University), Karina Vamling (Malmö University) and Alexandra Yatsyk (Kazan Federal University).

Contributions include:

  • Andrey Makarychev and Alexandra Yatsyk: From Sochi – 2014 to FIFA – 2018: A Fading Sovereignty?
  • Bo Petersson and Karina Vamling: Fifteen Minutes of Fame Long Gone: Circassian Activism before and after the Sochi Olympics
  • Jonathan Grix and Nina Kramareva: The Sochi Winter Olympics and Russia’s Unique Soft Power Strategy
  • Johan Ekberg and Michael Strange: What Happened to the Protests? – The Surprising Lack of Visible Dissent During the Sochi Winter Olympics
  • Ray Taras: Putin’s Sochi Hubris: Righting the Ship of Sport, Wronging the Ship of State?

New publication on iCircassia

coverLars Funch Hansen, senior lecturer at Caucasus Studies, has recently published the article iCircassia digital capitalism and new transnational identities in the first volume of the new Journal of Caucasian Studies.

What is iCircassia? As Lars Funch Hansen sees it “The significantly increased production of Circassian content on the Internet could be labelled as a form of virtual re-territorialisation of Circassia – especially considering the strong focus on identity and history. I apply the label ‘iCircassia’ as an addition to the classical understanding of the Circassian World as consisting of Circassians of the homeland and the diaspora.”

More information at: http://www.jocas.net/index.php/jocasen/article/view/4

Void Pasts and Marginal Presents

New publication in Slavic Review. Interdisciplinary Quarterly of Russian, Eurasian, and East European Studies. (73, 2)

Katrine Bendtsen Gotfredsen: Void Pasts and Marginal Presents: On Nostalgia and Obsolete Futures in the Republic of Georgia

Abstract

In contemporary Georgia and beyond, nostalgia for the Soviet past is often ridiculed and dismissed as a reactionary wish to turn back time. In this article, however, I explore generational nostalgia as temporal displacement of present political struggles. Drawing on life story interviews with middle-aged and elderly people in the provincial town of Gori, I argue that nostalgic longings may be understood as active attempts to presence personal pasts and futures that have publicly been rendered absent by an official rhetoric and practice that explicitly rejects the Soviet past. From this perspective, post-Soviet generational nostalgia temporally connects several dimensions of absence: the experience of one’s personal past being publicly cast as void; a perceived lack of social security, influence, and significance in the present; and a dynamic whereby these two dimensions render former dreams and visions for the future obsolete.

http://www.slavicreview.illinois.edu/current/abstracts732/index.html#gotfredsen

The Sochi Predicament

The Sochi Predicament:
Contexts, Characteristics and Challenges of the Olympic Winter Games in 2014

Published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013.

Sochi_CSP“For a variety of political, climatic, ecological, security-related and other reasons, the Russian summer resort of Sochi by the Black Sea would seem a most unlikely candidate for the Olympic Winter Games. Despite this, the Games will be held there in February 2014, and the Russian leaders regard the Games as a highly prestigious project underlining Russia’s return to a status of great power in the contemporary world. This book conducts a thorough inventory of the contexts, characteristics and challenges facing the Sochi Games. It deals with the problems from Russian, Georgian, Abkhazian and Circassian perspectives and makes in-depth analyses of profound challenges related to matters such as identity, security, and ethnic relations. The book brings together an international group of eminent scholars representing different disciplinary perspectives, including political science, sports science, ethics, ethnology, and Caucasian studies.”

Karina Vamling is the co-editor together with Bo Petersson. Lars Funch Hansen and Revaz Tchantouria, both lecturers at Caucasus Studies, are the authors of two of the chapters.

Table of Contents

Introduction
The Sochi Winter Olympics: Walking  Tightrope?
– Bo Petersson and Karina Vamling

Part I: Olympic Perspectives
1 Snow, Ice, and Vertical Drops: What is Different about the Sochi Olympics?
– Raymond Taras
2 The Sochi Winter Games: Marketing and Sustainable Development—Or Neither Nor?
– Karin Book
3 Environmental Ethics and the Olympics: On the Reconstruction of Nature for Sport
– Kutte Jönsson

Part II: Identity Matters
4 Olympism and Empire: The Olympic Myth in the Contestation of the Caucasus
– Emil Persson
5 Sochi as a Site of Circassian Long-Distance Memorialisation
– Lars Funch Hansen
6 The Sympols of Sochi 2014: Searching for the Visual Signs of New Russian Political Identity
– Sergei Akopov and Vitalii Volkov

Part III: Internal Order and Security
7  Russia’s Olympic Discourses: Effects of Unification and Diversification
– Andrei Makarychev
8  Securitization in the North Caucasus on the Eve of the Sochi Games
– Uliana Hellberg
9 The Terrorist Threat Against Sochi 2014
– Jakob Hedenskog

Part IV: Caucasian Knots
10 Security of the Winter Olympics in Sochi from a Georgian Perspective
– Alexandre Kukhianidze
11 Abkhazia and the Preparations for the Sochi Games
– Revaz Tchantouria
12 Disputed Frontiers: Abkhazia in Russia’s Sochi 2014 Project
– Helena Rytövuouri-Apunen