Snapshots

(camera noise when taking picture)…Adelaide Zoo…

Since I came to Adelaide, I’ve always wanted to go to its Zoo.                                                        I don’t like zoos in general, because I don’t like to see animals behind bars. I always have the impression that animals, there, look either sad or bored. Even if you tell me that they were born in captivity and that they are in the zoo for their own protection and survival, I still think  animals should live in their own natural habitat and not in a barred enclosure. Anyway, as the ticket to the city’s zoo is a bit expensive I was unsure whether to go or not, but then…the chance “rained” on me.                                                                                                  These past few days (and weeks) we have only had rain with more rain in between, the only difference being in the quality of the rain: classic rain, drizzle, light rain, moderate rain, slanted rain, straight down rain, rainstorm…We have enjoyed the whole rain catalogue. Then, during one of these wet days, while surfing the net, a notification from the StudyAdelaide website for international students “rain-dropped” in my email in-box informing me of a ‘Free Entry’ to Adelaide Zoo. Gotcha!!

Home to over 1,800 animals and almost 300 species of exotic and native mammals, birds, reptiles and fish, Adelaide Zoo was founded in the 19th century and has grown over time to be one of the most important zoos in Australia. In fact, it is the second oldest zoo in the nation and, having retained most of its original architectural features, has a unique feeling to it.                                                                                                                                                             Its most important “attraction” and the one I wanted to see the most: Giant Pandas.              The only two Giant Pandas in the Southern Hemisphere are here.                                            My expectations were high, a bit too high. They were scaled down as soon as I entered the ‘Bamboo forest’, home to the two pandas. First, if you call some scattered bamboo clumps a forest, then you clearly have a poor eyesight. Second, the two pandas were separated at the time: one looked really bored/sad and their enclosure appeared too small for them. However, it was really nice to see them both (we do not have pandas in any zoo in Italy) and, as to the zoo overall animal range,  the aviary was impressive. I have never seen so many exotic birds in one place.

The Adelaide Zoo has now been officially ticked off my ‘last-places-to-see-before-I-leave’ list.

 

(camera noise when taking picture)…Five Stones game…

During these rainy days, finding ways to break the monotony of exams-studying and rain ticketing has been a recurrent thought and effort.                                                                      And just last night my Singaporean friends have added a new “books-escaping past time” to the list: the Five Stones game.                                                                                                      This traditional Singaporean game, popular also in other parts of Southeast Asia, is played with five small triangular cloth bags filled with seeds, rice or sand. The number of players is from two onwards. One point is scored each time a player completes the eight steps          by throwing and catching the five stones.                                                                                          To check out the eight steps: http://infopedia.nl.sg/articles/SIP_194_2005-01-07.html Recommendation: the game is highly addictive and time consuming; if you have ‘study’ to do, play judiciously.

 

 

About Alessandro Sereni

I am a third year student at "Università Degli Studi Roma Tre" in Rome . I'm majoring in "Political Science for Cooperation and Development" . My main interests are : international politics ; geopolitical dynamics in East Asia ; languages ; Asian culture ( in particular Chinese one ) .
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