En Route

4/8, 13:30 PM

I am so glad that I have discovered the chilled waiting cubicles available on most train platforms (they are obvious once you are aware of them, but poor signage lead to most tourists suffering outside). Being cool increases the convenience of waiting for trains by a mile. Kyoto, which I have just left for Hiroshima and the INU Student Seminar commencing today, is notably hotter than Tokyo. Another way of avoiding the heat is to spend time in shops equipped with air-conditioner, something I have dedicated most of my time to do whilst in Kyoto. Despite spending countless of hours exploring almost every traditional Kyoto craft shop I must admit being a tad disappointed by the offering. If its truly traditional it’s ridiculously expensive, otherwise it’s mostly cheap kitsch. Before finding this out I bought a load of bubble wrap in the Japanese equivalent of a £1 shop (JPY 100 shop), believing I was going to wrap tons of Japanese ceramics. So potteryless I am now dragging around two huge rolls of bubble wrap. Luckily they are super light and they serve a good excuse for purchasing and wrapping loads of Japanese beer and Hiroshima made sake to bring back to the UK. With neither a decent Yukata in sight, despite looking around in second hand shops, not a classic Kyoto knife (the only REAL old knife producer, unlike many other, was closed) I have left Kyoto with barely more than a few pairs of silk socks and a mini Totoro figure (an essential buy if you love the film).

Since the temple shut their door at 9 PM, in order for the guests to wake up refreshed at 5 AM and participate in the morning ceremony, there have been no social activities late at night during my stay. Instead I have enjoyed watching the monks going about their business in the temple village and the older, more religious, demographic of Japan, who prays outside the temples in the morning. This demographic is also extremely well mannered and gives everyone they meet, without exception, a good morning greeting followed by a short bow. Therefor peaceful morning walks in the temple village was pretty intensive since you have to stop every 5 seconds in order to greet. At 7 AM a vegetarian breakfast was served in the dining hall, in accordance with Buddhist teaching of not killing any living creatures. Scattered outside the temple area is many vegetarian (and a vegan Michelin starred restaurant!) to my delight. On the note of vegetarian food, the pillow I slept on during my stay in the temple was filled with rice and must have been the most uncomfortable piece of bedding ever made. I rather sleep on my bare arms than on a bag of rice, which felt like a lump of concrete after a while.

Whilst in Kyoto I had many new culinary experiences. The vendors at the Nishiki food market happily gives away their samples and after passing through what felt like hundreds of stalls I was completely stuffed. As a green tea lover I am thrilled by all green tea filled stuff and the only food item I dislike so far is the Daifuku, filled with Azuki bean paste. I suppose you get used to them as treats if you grow up eating them, but I cannot understand the Japanese joy over Azuki bean paste. However, I have enjoyed plenty of raw egg in Kyoto. Raw egg and noodles, raw egg for breakfast and raw egg, which to be fair you later cooked yourself on a mini gas stove at your table, with rice. Will do further research if this is a typical Kyoto thing.
A final note, I really appreciate the Japanese traditional Ofuro baths I have been fortunate of having every single night before going to bed. The picture below is from my Tokyo bath but I have enjoyed a similar styled one in Kyoto as well.

Sayonara!

/ Hedvig

1.Platform cubicle, 2. Temple stay, 3. Raw egg, 4. More raw egg, 5. Bath

CubicleTemple

Raw Egg

Another Raw Egg

Bath

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About Sara Nadja och Hedvig

Hi, We are three of the four participants of the INU 2013 Student seminar of global citizenship and peace, held in Hiroshima, Japan. Nadja El-Hinidy Nilsson is studying social work at the faculty of health and society. Hedvig Obenius and Sarah Scott Oschner are studying human rights at the faculty of culture and society at Malmö University. During the seminar in Japan we will share our experinces, both personal and academic, with the hopes of encouraging other students at Malmö University to apply for next years INU seminar!

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